Bacon Naan

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Stravaig
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Dishoom. Thie bacon naan is kinda a cult thing. So of course I had to try it. £20 for the kit and £6.50 delivery. Woo. That doesn't sound attractive.

Included in the package were some blobs of dough to make a naan. Blugh, it was quite vile. I qualified as a chef 20+ years ago after I retired. I just said to husband - go across the road and get a naan from Asda.

The bacon is a bit stinky poo. (Asda's bacon is alway very nice.)

The red stuff is horribly sweet.

OK, I get the idea but I won't buy this again. It's a good idea. Very poorly executed.
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Sounds like something they were promoting on radio the other day "Turkey bacon" ?
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Stravaig
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Some religions prohibit eating pig. Jay Raynor, theoretically a Jew, as is my pal Tim, both like bacon. I mean if there really is a God would he try to prevent you from eating the best thing in the world? I spend all my sabbaths knocking on doors trying to convert people to atheism. I think it would be quite fun to be God. You could spend a lot of time making up rules to stop people enjoying life.

OK, let's have a go. It is evil to do any gardening on Wednesdays. Eating parsley is a sin. You are not allowed to smile before 3pm.You can sit at your desk and make up lies about people -oops, that one is real but we've since had an apology for it. Yay! :D

Brits are funny about bacon. We eat back bacon, which is most usually made in Denmark, and they don't eat it there. (Before I was married I had a Danish boyfriend. He was 6'8" - and built to scale.) Every other country where pig is eaten usually has streaky. Ayrshire middle is good. You get back with a bit of streaky attached. I bought a book about how to make bacon from pork loin or pork belly, and a professional slicer machine. I was going to be a one girl making bacon production factory. I would probably have become very popular. But Putin invaded and we got evac'd. Now there is Asda across the road so my bacon plans seem to be on permanent hold.

Oh yes, turkey ham. Yuk. When I was in Kenya it was beef bacon. Believe me that was bowf. Bacon is cured pork. If you don't eat pork, then you can't have bacon. Sure, you can cure other meats and call it what you like but it ain't bacon.

Another thing, despite being a Scot, I think haggis is disgusting. I've never liked it. But I do like vegetarian haggis. My stepfather was the sort of gannet who would eat everything and anything. The only thing in the universe that he didn't like was vegetarian haggis. :D
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Primrose
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Talking abiut bacon, I remember the long sides of it which were sold in our wartime grocery shop, with back and streaky still combined and the rind still attached. . It's almost impossible to buy bacon in that state now, either with the rind still on or in its "dry" state. Do they inject bacon sides with water now to increase its weight and profitability?

I can recall my mum cutting off the rinds to fry in a frying pan and make crispy snacks with them. Another thing of the past!
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Wet cure, they inject brine into the pork to turn it to bacon, hence the white water that comes out of it in the pan.
You have to look for "dry-cure" bacon.
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Primrose
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Thanks for that info Peter it,s pretty rare to be able to buy that. Virtually all the bacon yiu can buy now in supermarkets is wrapped I'm plastic.the grocer used to put the side of bacon on his slicing machine and you could choose a thick or thin cut according to your preference.
Stravaig
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It is really tempting to go for DIY. And I agree that dry cure would be my preference, but Asda's bacon really is very good. Not expensive either.

Husband has been invited for coffee at the Lords. The guy who invited him is a Scotsman so I'm going to make butteries (rowies) as a gift. You can't get these things for love nor money down here in Kent/London. I hope he's pleased. :-)
Stravaig
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Apparently His Lordship was delighted with the butteries. He lives on the West Coast and it's unusual to get butteries outside the North East (of Scotland).

I think my usual recipe might be from the Hairy Bikers "Food Tour of Britain" book, which I couldn't find in the house. Maybe it's still in storage. However, I got Gary Maclean's book not so long ago. (Scotland's National Chef) So, I thought I'd give that a go. Never again. I did start by following the recipe, after all it's baking not cooking. The quantity of salt - 15g per 500g of strong flour seemed excessive to me. Most recipes I could find, not necessarily for butteries, used about a teaspoon (which was about half of the 15g I'd measured out. I used a teaspoon and they were salty enough. But there was so much butter! They rose up like flaky pastry on steroids and floated in a butter bath. We got shot of the extra butter by mopping it up with kitchen roll, but I wouldn't use that recipe again. The finished item tasted fine but it didn't look great - even worse than the usual "road kill croissants".

What a pity because we greatly admired Gary on the telly and I was looking forward to making some of the recipes in the book "Scottish Kitchen" or something like that. This buttery experience has put me off. I'm not a fan of the Hairy Bikers but I have several of their books and they're great!
Stravaig
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Bacon naan is a terrific idea - in theory. You get a naan, ie flat bread, and fill it with various things, including bacon. What's not to like? But I didn't like it. I really thought I could DIY it better. £20+ and delivery, nah. I could go to Asda with a tenner in my pocket and come home and make something much better. I still like the idea. I just think that the Dishoom bacon naan is over hyped.
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