Autumn raspberries

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Mikew
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My raspberry plants are well established and are getting a bit out of hand. I cut them back to ground level in the winter but should I thin them out when they re-emerge in the spring ?
Westi
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I don't know whether you technically should or not but when I cut mine back in Feb or near there I do try to thin them by digging one or two roots out at the same time if they are particularly close.
Westi
Stephen
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Mike, autumn fruiting raspberries are very invasive but also resiliant. When I cut them down in winter I just dig the unwanted plants out.
Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.
tigerburnie
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A little trick with Autumn fruiting Rasps is to not cut all the canes to the ground, I leave a few that are only cut down by half, I then get an earlier crop of the same tasty fruits, I have some close to harvesting now, last year they lasted well through September and into October.
Been gardening for over 65 years and still learning.
tigerburnie
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Picked my first autumn fruiting rasps today, only half a dozen, but the above mentioned pruning method worked.
Been gardening for over 65 years and still learning.
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