Why not try something a little different?

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Geoff
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Why not try something a little different?

Postby Geoff » Fri Nov 20, 2020 5:47 pm

To celebrate my minor milestone I thought I would repeat my favourite post, not quite the right time of year but then it is a year like no other.

How about Liquorice?

Liquorice, Glycyrrhiza glabra is a hardy herbaceous plant and tolerates temperatures down to -15°C. Liquorice is deep rooting and is best grown in the ground. It does not usually grow well in containers unless they are large and very deep. A dustbin would be ideal. The planting season is either October, or February and March so you are only just too late if you get organised quickly. In the autumn it likes a dressing of farmyard manure. Unfortunately you have to be patient. During the first two years the growth is slight, the plants not rising above a foot. Not until the end of the third season will the roots be ready to take up for use, but harvesting generally best left to the autumn of the fourth year. As you can see it is quite a pretty plant that eventually grows about one metre tall.

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The roots and runners of the plants are taken up in late autumn. When required, they are crushed to a pulp and boiled in water, the decoctions are run off and then evaporated over direct heat, till a suitable consistency is obtained, being constantly stirred to prevent burning. While warm, the mass is taken out and rolled into sticks, stamped and stacked on boards to dry. Like with all vegetables, nothing you can buy quite compares with that you produce yourself.
There are several varieties to choose from. The variety 'Pontefract' is the hardiest form, 'Pozan' is commonly grown but is less hardy than 'Pontefract' requiring winter protection in the cooler parts of the country.
The first lady of propagation

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recommends a variety selected from Pontefract - Glycyrrhiza Bassettiana - it is easier to grow and has the sweetest taste. As you would expect she suggests the easiest method of propagation is root cuttings inserted into an open compost and with the application of a little bottom heat you will have your own plants in no time.

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So why not give it a try, go out today and buy some of the readily available cuttings.
4 x
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oldherbaceous
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Re: Why not try something a little different?

Postby oldherbaceous » Sat Nov 21, 2020 10:14 am

Glad to see they had a couple of misses in the tray, if not, I would have started to worry I was doing something wrong. :wink:
0 x
Kind Regards, Old Herbaceous.

There's no fool like an old fool.
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Geoff
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Re: Why not try something a little different?

Postby Geoff » Sat Nov 21, 2020 6:34 pm

I never noticed that. Did you spot the minor milestone?
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